As industrial hemp production in Kansas has declined, hemp products are taking hold.Image ofNickyPeofPixabay“/>
As industrial hemp production in Kansas has declined, hemp products are taking hold.

Image by NickyPe from Pixabay

By LESLIE EIKLEBERRY
Salina substation

Over the years, industrial hemp has had a bad reputation because of its cousin, marijuana. While marijuana is still illegal in many states, including Kansas, industrial hemp is not.

Production of industrial hemp in Kansas began in 2019, with 2,782 acres planted and 1,831 acres harvested, according to information from the Kansas Department of Agriculture. In 2020, 3,968 acres of industrial hemp were planted, while only 761 acres were harvested. According to a report by Brian Grimmett for the Kansas News Service, an eighth of the 2020 crop “must have been burned by the state because it contained too much psychoactive chemical THC.”

READ: Kan farmers. : The only thing harder than growing hemp? sell it

This year, only 481 acres were planted, the Kansas Department of Agriculture noted. Harvest statistics for 2021 are not yet available.

In addition, in 2019 and 2020, the areas planted were mainly (around 90%) intended for flower / CBD production. In 2021, only 22% of the acres planted in 2021 were for flower / CBD production; grain / fiber was 21%, seed / grain was 40%, fiber was 17%, according to information provided to Salina Post by the Kansas Department of Agriculture.

So why cultivate industrial hemp?

“Hemp fibers are used to weave baskets, make prosthetics as well as sunglasses frames and homes. Hemp plastics are a renewable and responsible way to replace petroleum-based plastics,” he told Salina Peggy DeBey, co-owner of The Flower Nook. To post.

The Flower Nook recently introduced a line of products made from industrial hemp. The products, made by Hemp3D, include board games, sunglasses, bottle openers, skateboards and jewelry.

<b>These sunglasses and earrings are among the hemp items currently sold in The Flower Nook, 208 E. Iron.</b> Photo courtesy of <a href="https://www.facebook.com/TheFlowerNookSalina">The Flower Corner </a>Facebook page
These sunglasses and earrings are among the hemp items currently sold in The Flower Nook, 208 E. Iron. Photo courtesy of Flower Nook’s Facebook page

According to the Hemp3D website, “Hemp fibers are among the longest, strongest, and most durable of all natural fibers and have many desirable mechanical properties, including high impact and flexural strength.”

DeBey said she discovered industrial hemp and Hemp3D after a commodity convention hosted by South Bend Industrial Hemp in Great Bend.

“I knew I wanted to introduce this product to the community. I made several calls to the owners of the Hemp3d Company, of Steward, Neb., Expressing an interest in the product and the creative process involved,” said DeBey. “I learned that hemp can be made into a filament to be used for 3D printing. The product is biodegradable, recyclable and free of toxins, in addition to having a higher impact resistance than regular plastic.”